Putting nature recovery into law

Posted on 03 March 2021

Rewilding Britain are working with a huge alliance of environmental groups, from the RSPB to the Wildlife Trusts, to strengthen the Environment Bill with a ‘State of Nature’ target, which would bind the Government into reversing the decline in our wildlife by 2030.

We have a once in a generation chance to put the weight of the law behind protecting nature and set a global lead.

Will you help put on the pressure by signing their petition to the Prime Minister calling for a new legal guarantee for nature’s recovery by 2030. We need as many people as possible to demand better wildlife protection to ensure that this ‘State of Nature Amendment’ gets through. Signing the petition will demonstrate to the Government and politicians that the public want stronger protections for nature, and encourage them to amend the Bill.

Rewilding Britain want to see rewilding flourishing across Britain. But the UK currently sits as one of the most nature-depleted countries in the world. We’ve lost half our farmland birds in the past 50 years, 40% of all species have declined in number and many of our rivers are in a shocking state.

The Prime Minister has been calling on world leaders to halt nature’s decline by 2030. Later this year, governments will come together to agree a global target to stop our natural world from being destroyed. But there’s no legal commitment to do the same here at home. Promises to protect nature are meaningless if they’re not put into law. The Environment Bill, currently making its way through Parliament, doesn’t guarantee action. No targets would be binding until 2038, almost a decade later than the Government is demanding from other countries.

This new Environment Bill gives us the chance to set this right.

Watch the campaign video, sign the petition and read more via Rewilding Britain here.

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...the stunts we get up to on our community allotments!!

Planting a Victoria Plum, kindly donated and planted by Natalie, and then collecting and delivering a 1000 litre cube to The Triangle. 

Huge thanks to Worthing Coaches Official for donating a couple of cubes so we can harvest a lot more rainwater this year for our community fruit and veg growing.

...the stunts we get up to on our community allotments!!

Planting a Victoria Plum, kindly donated and planted by Natalie, and then collecting and delivering a 1000 litre cube to The Triangle.

Huge thanks to Worthing Coaches Official for donating a couple of cubes so we can harvest a lot more rainwater this year for our community fruit and veg growing.
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3 days ago

Hi Please share this post to anyone who might be interested in our trees. Warmest wishes Carol from The Birch Tree Project fb.watch/iq2n00b_CG/ ... See MoreSee Less

Hugelkultur, pronounced Hoo-gul-culture, means hill culture or hill mound. We call them Huggies down in Carondelet.

Instead of putting branches, leaves and grass clippings in bags by the curbside for the bin men... build a hugel bed. Simply mound logs, branches, leaves, grass clippings, straw, cardboard, petroleum-free newspaper, manure, compost or whatever other biomass you have available, top with soil and plant your veggies.

The advantages of a hugel bed are many, including:

The gradual decay of wood is a consistent source of long-term nutrients for the plants. A large bed might give out a constant supply of nutrients for 20 years (or even longer if you use only hardwoods). The composting wood also generates heat which should extend the growing season.

Soil aeration increases as those branches and logs break down... meaning the bed will be no till, long term.

The logs and branches act like a sponge. Rainwater is stored and then released during drier times. Actually you may never need to water your hugel bed again after the first year (except during long term droughts).

On a sod lawn we recommend cutting out the sod, digging a one foot deep trench and filling the trench with logs and branches. Then cover the logs with the upside down turf. On top of the turf add grass clippings, seaweed, compost, aged manure, straw, green leaves, mulch, etc...
This one here is a Garlic " Huggie " located in the Forest Park area of St. Louis.
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