Locally Grown and Dried Flowers

Posted on 22 November 2022

We are delighted to let you know that Breathing Spaces got ahead of the ‘trendy’ curve this year and dried lots of our locally and sustainably-grown flowers.

Even better news is that you can buy a bunch from HISBE Supermarket, Portland Street (until stocks run out), or cute little posies from the TTW stall at the Sustainability Market on December 4 when, if we are lucky, there will be the last of the fresh Chrysanthemums too.

It’s our first year of drying flowers and we are really pleased with the way many kept their colour. Of course we did it naturally with no extra heat, no dyes or chemicals, it just takes up a lot of cupboard space under the stairs!

It will be our last volunteer session of the year at Dankton Lane Barnyard, Sompting, from 11am to 1pm Sunday 4 December, weather permitting. Bring thick gloves and a drink/snack and dress for the weather. And we are still tending the flower farm on Thursday mornings at Maybridge Keystone Centre, Worthing BN12 6JD 10.30am-12.30pm, last session of the year on Thursday December 15.

Many thanks to all our fabulous volunteers, we have so enjoyed growing and being in nature this year with you, and to everyone who has bought flowers from us, covering our running costs and contributing to TTW overheads. Wishing everyone a peaceful and loving winter break and see you next year.

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...the stunts we get up to on our community allotments!!

Planting a Victoria Plum, kindly donated and planted by Natalie, and then collecting and delivering a 1000 litre cube to The Triangle. 

Huge thanks to Worthing Coaches Official for donating a couple of cubes so we can harvest a lot more rainwater this year for our community fruit and veg growing.

...the stunts we get up to on our community allotments!!

Planting a Victoria Plum, kindly donated and planted by Natalie, and then collecting and delivering a 1000 litre cube to The Triangle.

Huge thanks to Worthing Coaches Official for donating a couple of cubes so we can harvest a lot more rainwater this year for our community fruit and veg growing.
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Hugelkultur, pronounced Hoo-gul-culture, means hill culture or hill mound. We call them Huggies down in Carondelet.

Instead of putting branches, leaves and grass clippings in bags by the curbside for the bin men... build a hugel bed. Simply mound logs, branches, leaves, grass clippings, straw, cardboard, petroleum-free newspaper, manure, compost or whatever other biomass you have available, top with soil and plant your veggies.

The advantages of a hugel bed are many, including:

The gradual decay of wood is a consistent source of long-term nutrients for the plants. A large bed might give out a constant supply of nutrients for 20 years (or even longer if you use only hardwoods). The composting wood also generates heat which should extend the growing season.

Soil aeration increases as those branches and logs break down... meaning the bed will be no till, long term.

The logs and branches act like a sponge. Rainwater is stored and then released during drier times. Actually you may never need to water your hugel bed again after the first year (except during long term droughts).

On a sod lawn we recommend cutting out the sod, digging a one foot deep trench and filling the trench with logs and branches. Then cover the logs with the upside down turf. On top of the turf add grass clippings, seaweed, compost, aged manure, straw, green leaves, mulch, etc...
This one here is a Garlic " Huggie " located in the Forest Park area of St. Louis.
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